Spirit Filled Ministry

The Weapons of Our Warfare: A Commentary on 2 Corinthians 10:4-5

God has armed believers with powerful ὅπλον (hoplon) “weapons.” Greeks applied this word as a title for heroic citizen-soldiers armed with long spears and shields. The Captain of the Lord’s Hosts has called believers, as citizens of heaven, into active military service. These weapons are not associated with the fallen, earthly real (σαρκικός (sarkikos), but “mighty” through God. Worldly leaders, at every level, seek to raise higher by means of pulling others down. Soldiers of the cross seek to lift others higher even at their own expense. Not a single weapon of God is designed to lift up his army by debasing other people. The Lord never funds, energizes, or even gives the nod to ego inflating activities. The church possesses weapons for pulling down prideful demonic positions in order to lift up hurting humanity.

Read More »

Condemnation and Conviction: The Vital Difference

Certain words have, in addition to merely waltzing across the stage of time, actually propelled the script of history. In particular, the interplay between two meaning-dense words can create something like a grammatical nuclear reaction; the waves of which touch every level of human existence. How people understand their meaning, source, and relationship to one another determines the course of individual lives, nations, and eternal destinies. Yes; words contain that much power. Understanding fuels application and, in turn, application determines outcome. For example, based on the handling of the terms “love” and “hate,” governments topple or bloom; families fracture or flourish; and churches either swim in redemption or sink in deception.

Read More »

Logos and Rhema

Two years into my relationship with Jesus, someone handed me a book by Kenneth E. Hagin. Five minutes and two pages later, the book grabbed and held my attention until I read its last word. Over the following six months, I found Hagin’s books exceedingly helpful in illuminating many key New Testament concepts. After three years, I had read every Kenneth Hagin book in print. I noted that his works, while full of Scripture, contained a great deal of anecdotal material. In other words, Hagin consistently couched his teachings in personal stories. This writing style set in motion two separate phenomena. First, it made Hagin’s books exceptionally reader friendly. This allowed the power contained therein to spread across the world to a wide audience. His anecdotal style also unintentionally placed Hagin as a favorite target on the scholarly, criticism-driven firing range.

Read More »

Four Methods for Mishandling the Greek New Testament

Pastors often take sarcastic jabs at the study of Greek. Embedded in their sermons, one might hear statements such as “Theologians might know what the Greek verse says, but, praise God, I know the one who said it!” While a personal relationship with Christ certainly outweighs one’s knowledge of the Greek, Jesus never rejoices in our ignorance of the same. In fact, a familiarity with the Greek can greatly deepen one’s knowledge of God. The Greek New Testament belongs neither high on a dusty bookshelf nor in an obscure corner of a dreary library. Instead, it seeks residence in the hearts of those seeking to know its author. God has saddled pastors with the mandate of perfecting the saints in the knowledge of Christ. The Greek contains enormous resources geared toward producing such perfection. Therefore, rather than turning away in ignorance, let us turn in with vigor.

Read More »